WiPS. Conflict, Co-Regulation and Congruence: Sociocultural Influences on ADHD, Kathrin Bauer, 22 February

Thursday, the 22nd February from 5 to 7 pm CET via Zoom.

“Conflict, Co-Regulation and Congruence: Sociocultural Influences on ADHD”

by Kathrin Bauer, Freie Universität Berlin

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common diagnoses given to children in “the West” and in urban centers around the world. My research shows that ADHD – at least as defined in diagnostic manuals – is almost inexistent in several Colombian rural communities. In my presentation, I will share three concepts relevant to understand this difference. 1) Congruence: ADHD can be framed as an incongruence between children’s behaviour and expectations towards children (and thus between socialization practices and goals?). Moreover, cultural differences in perceived congruence and attitudes towards it might contribute to the development of ADHD. 2) Co-Regulation: While the biomedical model of ADHD focuses on (impaired) self-regulation, I highlight the role of co-regulation both as a resource on which children can rely and as an integral element in the development of self-regulation. 3) Conflict: The ways conflicts are appraised and approached in communities are meaningful in regards to ADHD.

The ENPA Works-in-Progress Seminar is a venue for researchers, faculty and postgraduate students to present ongoing work, receive feedback and share ideas about their research in psychological anthropology and allied fields. 

The seminar meets monthly via Zoom.

To join ENPA WiPS and receive the link for the seminar, please register here.

WiPS. Care and Belonging in Ambiguity: Homemaking Practices of Syrian Families in Turkey, Begüm Ergün, 30 November

Thursday, the 30th of November from 5 to 7 pm CET via Zoom.

Care and Belonging in Ambiguity: Homemaking Practices of Syrian Families in Turkey

by Begüm Ergün, Boston University

In this paper, I aim to delve into the nuanced meanings of “home” and homemaking practices among Syrian migrants as they navigate through complex layers of displacement, disaster, and the intricate dynamics of ambiguous hospitality in Turkey. I will explore how Syrian families experience home, as a combination of affects, material sites and care relationships pertaining to the interplay between macro-level disaster aid politics and micro-level family care dynamics. This exploration is inspired by ethnographic moments that bring the temporality and materiality of home and homemaking into sharper focus, particularly in the aftermath of the earthquake. I argue that to gain a comprehensive understanding of the meanings attached to home and homemaking practices among Syrian families, we must incorporate a series of crises that profoundly impact migrants’ daily lives. What theoretical insights potentially emerge concerning home, care, power, and belonging by exploring the homemaking practices and disaster rebuilding efforts of Syrian families? 

The ENPA Works-in-Progress Seminar is a venue for researchers, faculty and postgraduate students to present ongoing work, receive feedback and share ideas about their research in psychological anthropology and allied fields. 

The seminar meets monthly via Zoom.

To join ENPA WiPS and receive the link for the seminar, please register here.

WiPS. Hearing Humanity: Counselling and Psychotherapy as an Intimate Educational Anthropology, Dr. John Loewenthal, 26 October

Thursday, the 26th of October from 5 to 7 pm CET via Zoom.

“Hearing Humanity: Counselling and Psychotherapy as an Intimate Educational Anthropology”

by Dr. John Loewenthal from Keele University

Human acts of talking about their lives, and the therapeutic practice of listening, provide an intimate window into what makes us human. This presentation shares a research proposal that seeks to speak with therapists across the United Kingdom to explore their encounters with Anyone (Rapport, 2012), human beings, whoever they are, simultaneously unique and representatives of humanity. The research has three aims: 1) to test the hypothesis that counselling/psychotherapy forms a quintessential anthropo-logy – a study of human beings – and whether this intimate scale of enquiry forms of new frontier for anthropology; 2) to explore the extent to which therapy shows the significance of cultural and identity-based differences and/or a cosmopolitan transcendence of such differences by showing our common humanity; 3) to explore the educational undercurrent of being human that is facilitated in therapy in helping people learn to live and to address myriad aspects of the human condition. 

The ENPA Works-in-Progress Seminar is a venue for researchers, faculty and postgraduate students to present ongoing work, receive feedback and share ideas about their research in psychological anthropology and allied fields. 

The seminar meets monthly via Zoom.

To join ENPA WiPS and receive the link for the seminar, please register here.